Effects of chronic consumption of specific fruit (berries, cherries and citrus) on cognitive health: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

Lodge, John, Wang, Yueyue, Haskell-Ramsay, Crystal and Lara Gallegos, Jose (2022) Effects of chronic consumption of specific fruit (berries, cherries and citrus) on cognitive health: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. ISSN 0954-3007 (In Press)

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41430-022-01138-x

Abstract

Objectives
The cognitive-protective effects related to the consumption of a variety of fruits are supported by several intervention studies. This systematic review and meta-analysis compared the magnitude of effects following chronic (≥1 week) consumption of frozen, freeze-dried powder including extracts and juices of fruits, covering berries, cherries and citrus, on cognition and mood in adults.

Methods
PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and psycARTICLES were searched from inception until February, 2021. Inclusion criteria were randomised controlled trials assessing memory, executive function, psychomotor speed, mood and mini mental state examination in adult participants ≥18 years of age. Cognition was tested by global or domain specific tasks.

Results
Out of 13,861 articles identified, 16 papers were included; 11 studies provided suitable data for meta-analysis. Fourteen studies reported improvement or trend for improvement in cognition, five studies assessed mood and one study supplementing grape juice found trend for mood improvement. From the meta-analysis, cherry juice supplementation was suggested to improve psychomotor speed by −0.37 of standardised mean difference (95% CI [−0.74, 0.01]) in reaction time (P = 0.05).

Conclusions
The meta-analysis did not sufficiently support a role for fruits or fruit forms to improve cognition and mood.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B400 Nutrition
B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Applied Sciences
Depositing User: John Coen
Date Deposited: 11 Apr 2022 11:06
Last Modified: 28 Apr 2022 10:00
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/48862

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